Welcome to theBad.net Lee Van Cleef Blog! Here you will find information, photos, videos, and some of my opinions of the badman himself.

Many thanks to the wonderful fans of theBad.net for their contributions and continued enthusiasm!

Saturday, February 27, 2021

Saturday, February 13, 2021

VHS Flashback: Mean Frank & Crazy Tony

Before streaming, blu-ray, and DVD, most LVC films were only available on home video cassette tapes, usually VHS (but also Betamax).  Many of us discovered these films for the first time in these formats (usually cropped and edited).


Often times due to rights issues, these films were given new titles (some similar to the original, some not).  Often the cover image of LVC was not from the actual film!

Here is a look back at the old VHS LVC video covers for Mean Frank & Crazy Tony!










Saturday, February 6, 2021

RIP: Alberto Grimaldi

Frequent LVC producer Alberto Grimaldi has passed away at age 95.

Full article from Variety below-


By Ellise Shafer

Jan 24, 2021

Alberto Grimaldi, a film producer whose credits include the Spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” and Martin Scorsese’s “Gangs of New York,” has died. He was 95.

For a Few Dollars More

Grimaldi’s son, Maurizio Grimaldi, confirmed his death to Variety, adding that his father died of natural causes.

The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly

Born in Naples, Italy on March 28, 1925, Grimaldi originally studied law before starting his own production company, Produzioni Europee Associati, or P.E.A., in 1961. The first feature film Grimaldi produced was the Spanish western film “L’ombra di Zorro,” which released the following year. Grimaldi produced his first Spaghetti Western film, “I due violenti,” in 1964. P.E.A. became known for its low-budget action movies that were often co-productions with Spain and West Germany, and remained active until the early ’80s.

The Big Gundown

In 1965, Grimaldi first collaborated with Sergio Leone on the international co-production “For a Few Dollars More,” starring Clint Eastwood. The two also worked together the following year, when Grimaldi produced Leone’s epic Spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” which scored $25 million at the box office and is credited with skyrocketing Eastwood to fame.

Sabata

Grimaldi worked as a producer on over 80 films in Europe and the United States during his career, which spanned four decades. Other notable titles include “Burn!” in 1969, 1972’s “Last Tango in Paris” starring Marlon Brando, “Man of La Mancha” in 1972 starring Sophia Loren, “Illustrious Corpses” in 1976 and “Ginger and Fred” in 1986. His last film production was Scorsese’s “Gangs of New York” in 2002, which starred Daniel Day-Lewis, Leonardo DiCaprio, Cameron Diaz and Liam Neeson and was nominated for nine Academy Awards, including best picture.

Return of Sabata

Grimaldi is survived by his three children, Massimo, Maurizio and Marcello, and three grandchildren.


https://variety.com/2021/film/news/alberto-grimaldi-dead-dies-producer-the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly-1234891108/



Saturday, January 30, 2021

RIP: Antonio Sabàto

LVC co-star Antonio Sabàto from Beyond the Law has passed away at age 77.

Full article from The New York Times below-


By Alex Vadukul

Jan. 21, 2021

This obituary is part of a series about people who have died in the coronavirus pandemic. Read about others here.

As a boy growing up in Palermo, Sicily, in the 1950s, Antonio Sabàto dreamed of becoming a movie star.

He’d sneak into cinemas to watch the latest films of Luchino Visconti. He ran away from home more than once to infiltrate the Cinecittà film studio in Rome and try to talk his way into jobs. He adored American movies and idolized Marlon Brando.

Mr. Sabàto realized his ambition: He became a popular Italian actor known for his roles in a gamut of spaghetti westerns and action movies from the 1960s through the 1980s. Among them were “Beyond the Law,” with Lee Van Cleef, and “Twice a Judas,” with Klaus Kinski, both from 1968.

In 1983, he played the resistance leader Dablone in the cult classic “Escape From the Bronx.”

Mr. Sabàto died at 77 on Jan. 10 at a hospice in Hemet, Calif. The cause was complications of Covid-19, his son, the actor Antonio Sabàto Jr., said.

Antonio Sr. was born on April 2, 1943, in Montelepre, a town outside Palermo. His father, Giuseppe, was a port manager in Palermo. His mother, Agata (Parinello) Sabàto, was a homemaker.

In an interview on Italian state television in his later years, Mr. Sabàto remembered an early break in the mid-1960s: The director Vittorio De Sica cast him in a bit part in the anthology film “The Witches” (1967). “That was my debut in cinema,” he said.

By the time that film was finally released, however, he had already caught a bigger break: being cast in John Frankenheimer’s 1966 car racing classic, “Grand Prix.” He starred as the Italian Formula One driver Nino Barlini, alongside James Garner and Yves Montand. The film won three Academy Awards, and Mr. Sabàto was recognized at the Golden Globes with a nomination for most promising newcomer.

“I was picked out of 2,000 people,” he said of the “Grand Prix” audition. “Evidently I was the one John Frankenheimer was looking for.” He added: “So I did ‘Grand Prix’ as one of its four protagonists. And I got to drive a Ferrari.”

Living in Rome, Mr. Sabàto became part of the city’s glamorous international cultural scene. Stars like Claudia Cardinale and Sophia Loren frequented his dinner parties, and he befriended directors like Franco Zeffirelli.

But Mr. Sabàto dreamed of acting in America, and in the mid-1980s he moved to Los Angeles. Hollywood, though, wasn’t as welcoming as he thought it would be.

“They never treated him as a leading actor,” his son said. “The agents only sent him out for supporting roles: the cook or the chef. Why couldn’t he play the lawyer?” He added: “My dad was off the boat. If you had an accent, you didn’t have the same kind of opportunity here.”

But Mr. Sabàto embraced life in America and settled in California. He married Yvonne Saghy in 1971, and they divorced in the 1990s. In addition to his son, his survivors include a daughter, Simonne Sabàto, and three grandchildren.

In his later years he traveled to Sicily frequently and relished boating. He enjoyed attending the Indianapolis 500 with his old “Grand Prix” co-star, Mr. Garner, who died in 2014 at 86. And as the decades passed, his film legacy was revisited by fans of classic cinema in Italy.

That newfound interest included the Italian state television interview, a long recapping of his career. Mr. Sabàto was relaxing on a boat at a dock in Marina del Rey, Calif., when he was approached for the interview.

“Are you really Antonio Sabàto?” he was asked.

“From the very day I was born,” he replied.


https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/21/obituaries/antonio-sabato-dead-covid.htm



Saturday, January 23, 2021

VHS Flashback: Grand Duel

Before streaming, blu-ray, and DVD, most LVC films were only available on home video cassette tapes, usually VHS (but also Betamax).  Many of us discovered these films for the first time in these formats (usually cropped and edited).


Often times due to rights issues, these films were given new titles (some similar to the original, some not).  Often the cover image of LVC was not from the actual film!

Here is a look back at the old VHS LVC video covers for Grand Duel!
















Saturday, January 16, 2021

Soundtrack Review: The Greatest Themes From The Spaghetti Westerns - Performed by London Music Works


If you read this blog, I am sure you have some attachment to the great spaghetti western soundtracks featured in LVC and non-LVC films alike.  Of course Ennio Morricone reigned supreme, but there were also many other worthy composers (Luis Bacalov, Riz Ortolani) and performers (Alessandro Alessandroni, Edda Dell'Orso) that brought musical life to the genre.  We are lucky that countless original soundtracks are available in mostly complete forms.  

Personally I am not much of a fan or re-recordings.  I'm a purist.  I like the originals.  I am constantly playing many original albums on Spotify as I write this blog.  Every now and then something random gets thrown into the mix, which is how I discovered The Greatest Themes From The Spaghetti Westerns - Performed by London Music Works released in April of 2020.

This is a fantastic re-recording of many spaghetti western hits.  For the LVC fan specifically it has tracks from For a Few Dollars More, The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly, Big Gundown, Day of Anger, Death Rides a Horse, and Grand Duel.  The performances are very faithful to the originals, and greatly benefit from advancements in sound recording over the last 50+ years.

Standouts to me are the re-recordings of "Run Man Run" from Big Gundown, which offers a less harsh vocal the the Christy original, and the main theme from Death Rides a Horse, which offers a much fuller soundscape for the theme.

The album is worth checking out.  Track listing below-


Volume One 

01. EL GRINGO – Alessandro Alessandroni 
02. DJANGO From DJANGO – Luis Bacalov 
03. MAIN TITLE From TWO MULES FOR SISTER SARA – Ennio Morricone 
04. MAIN THEME From DEATH RIDES A HORSE – Ennio Morricone 
05. L’ARENA From THE MERCENARY – Ennio Morricone 
06. A SILHOUETTE OF DOOM From NAVAJO JOE – Ennio Morricone 
07. MAIN TITLE From NAVAJO JOE – Ennio Morricone 
08. PARTE PRIMA From THE GRAND DUEL – Luis Bacalov 
09. MAIN TITLES From THEY CALL ME TRINITY – Franco Micalizzi 
10. DAY OF ANGER From DAY OF ANGER – Riz Ortolani 
11. MAIN TITLES From HIS NAME WAS KING – Luis Bacalov 
12. OPENING CREDITS From THE BIG GUNDOWN – Ennio Morricone 

Volume Two 

01. MAIN TITLES From A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS – Ennio Morricone 
02. MAIN THEME From A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS – Ennio Morricone 
03. ALMOST DEAD From A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS – Ennio Morricone 
04. MAIN THEME From FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE – Ennio Morricone 
05. SIXTY SECONDS TO WHAT? From FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE – Ennio Morricone 
06. MAIN THEME From THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY – Ennio Morricone 
07. IL TRAMONTO From THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY – Ennio Morricone 
08. THE ECSTASY OF GOLD From THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY – Ennio Morricone 
09. TRIO From THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY – Ennio Morricone 
10. MAIN TITLE From MY NAME IS NOBODY – Ennio Morricone 
11. MY FAULT? From MY NAME IS NOBODY – Ennio Morricone 
12. MAIN THEME From DUCK, YOU SUCKER! – Ennio Morricone 
13. DOPO L’ESPLOSIONE From DUCK, YOU SUCKER! – Ennio Morricone 
14. FAREWELL CHEYENNE From ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST – Ennio Morricone 
15. MAN WITH A HARMONICA From ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST – Ennio Morricone
16. MAIN THEME From ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST – Ennio Morricone


Saturday, January 9, 2021

LVC WTF?

Found this on Facebook.  Pretty funny!  

Click to enlarge!




Saturday, January 2, 2021

VHS Flashback: Bad Man's River

Before streaming, blu-ray, and DVD, most LVC films were only available on home video cassette tapes, usually VHS (but also Betamax).  Many of us discovered these films for the first time in these formats (usually cropped and edited).


Often times due to rights issues, these films were given new titles (some similar to the original, some not).  Often the cover image of LVC was not from the actual film!

Here is a look back at the old VHS LVC video covers for Bad Man's River!